Collection

From Art Nouveau to ZERO, from Claude Monet to Gerhard Richter – the collection of the Kunstmuseen Krefeld now encompasses circa 18,000 works from the Late Middle Ages to the present day and continues to grow.

highlights

Since its beginnings around 1900, contemporary art and design currents have always encountered each other afresh from differing perspectives in the Kunstmuseen Krefeld.

The historical heart of the collection is formed by the holdings of objects related to the Reform Movement and Art Nouveau, which brought art and everyday design closer together. Some of the exceptional highlights are the Werkbund collection founded by Karl Ernst Osthaus 1909, the German Museum for Art in Commerce and Industry in addition to numerous works by Peter Behrens, Henry van de Velde and Johan Thorn Prikker.

Examples of classic modern art are included with such important individual works as The Houses of Parliament in London (1904) by Claude Monet and Deluge (1912) by Vasily Kandinsky. Special focus is placed on the extensive groups of works by the Rhenish Expressionists and Constructivist artists like Piet Mondrian.

The composition of the collection after 1945 is closely linked to the progressive exhibition program of contemporary art that brought the relevant artistic movements of the post-war era to Krefeld, at first in Haus Lange since the early 1960s and from 1981 in Haus Esters as well. Alongside major collections of works by Yves Klein and Joseph Beuys, the collection juxtaposes central protagonists from the Rhenish art scene—from Gerhard Richter and Sigmar Polke to Katharina Fritsch, Thomas Schütte and Andreas Gursky—with international pioneers of contemporary art like Andy Warhol, Richard Serra, Jeff Wall, Kiki Smith, Allora & Calzadilla and Elmgreen & Dragset.

Wassily Kandinsky, Deluge I, 1912, Photo: Volker Döhne
Wassily Kandinsky, Deluge I, 1912, Photo: Volker Döhne
Andreas Gursky, Mülheim an der Ruhr, 1989, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
Andreas Gursky, Mülheim an der Ruhr, 1989, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019
Josef Hoffmann, Carafe and Drinking Glasses out of the Series Var. B, around 1911, Photo: Volker Döhne
Josef Hoffmann, Carafe and Drinking Glasses out of the Series Var. B, around 1911, Photo: Volker Döhne
Claude Monet, Houses of Parliament in London, 1904, Photo: Volker Döhne
Claude Monet, Houses of Parliament in London, 1904, Photo: Volker Döhne
Yves Klein, Lecteur I.K.B. élégant, 1959, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019, Photo: Volker Döhne
Yves Klein, Lecteur I.K.B. élégant, 1959, © VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019, Photo: Volker Döhne
Peter Behrens, Allgemeine Elektricitäts Gesellschaft/A.E.G., 1907, Photo: Volker Döhne
Peter Behrens, Allgemeine Elektricitäts Gesellschaft/A.E.G., 1907, Photo: Volker Döhne

Currently on View

Works from our collection are currently on view in our Collection Presentation 1965 - 2017.

Currently on view are works from the following artists: Zvi Goldstein, Dan Graham, Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Bethan Huws, Tracey Moffatt und Gary Hillberg, Richard Allen Morris, Sigmar Polke, Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa, Gerhard Richter, Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth, Allan Uglow etc.

Research

The collection of the Kunstmuseen Krefeld is continuously studied and questioned based on ever-new perspectives by the museum’s staff as well as external scholars.

The wealth of the epochs and genres as well as the museum’s own eventful history offer multifaceted scholarly and educational possibilities. These include conservational work as well as art historical projects dedicated specifically to groups of works in the collection as well as research into the provenance of the museum’s holdings.

Provenance research generally characterises research on the origins of cultural goods. The investigation of the collection is of great importance for the Kunstmuseen Krefeld. The provenance of individual works is regularly carried out.

Provenienzforschung bezeichnet allgemein die Erforschung der Herkunft von kulturellen Gütern. Regelmäßig lassen die Kunstmuseen Krefeld die Provenienz einzelner Werke erforschen.

Conservation

The objective of conservation work is the care of the precious items in the collection and their preservation of behalf of future generations.

Actively tending to the material holdings represents an indispensable prerequisite for museum work as a whole. The daily challenges facing conservators in the field of modern art in particular rests in the almost infinitely large range of possible material combinations. The conservation work in the Kunstmuseen