Past exhibition

Folklore & Avant-garde
The Reception of Popular Traditions in the Age of Modernism
Kaiser Wilhelm Museum

Starting November 10, 2019, the Kunstmuseen Krefeld are presenting the exhibition “Folklore & Avantgarde. The Reception of Popular Traditions in the Age of Modernism” at the Kaiser Wilhelm Museum. This major survey exhibition takes a new look at the art of the early twentieth century. The age of Modernism tends to be associated with a departure from previous traditions and a new universal approach to art. However the Kunstmuseen Krefeld now explore the fascinating manner in which local popular traditions – especially handicrafts and folk art – influenced the protagonists of the avant-garde as they developed a new artistic language. The Kaiser Wilhelm Museum, which has been establishing links between art and everyday culture since its foundation, is the ideal site for this exhibition. "Folklore & Avantgarde" is the most ambitious show ever organized by the Kaiser Wilhelm Museum.

A catalog to accompany the exhibition, featuring texts by Katia Baudin, Elina Knorpp, Paul N'Guessan-Béchié, Gerda Breuer, Valery Dymshyts, Magdalena Holzhey, Jevgenia Iljukhina, Marjorie Jongbloed, Christina Kallieris, Wolfgang Kaschuba, Ákos Moravánszky, Erik Näslund, Valerie Rousseau, and Virginia Gardner Troy, will be published by Hirmer Verlag (German/English).

The exhibition is part of the Centenary project “100 years of bauhaus in the west” of the Ministery for Culture and Science of the Federal State of North-Rhine Westphalia as well as the Rhineland Regional Council and the Westphalia-Lippe Regional Council. Minister Isabel Pfeiffer-Poensgen is the patron of the project.

Curators
Katia Baudin, Director of Kunstmuseen Krefeld
Elina Knorpp, Art Historian, Cologne

Exhibition architecture
mvprojekte, Cologne
Meyer Voggenreiter and Nicole Miller

Artists (selection)
Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Theodor Bogler, Constantin Brancusi, Heinrich Campendonk, Marc Chagall, Nils Dardel, Sonia Delaunay, Johannes Driesch, Paul Gauguin, Natalia Goncharova, Marsden Hartley, Morris Hirshfield, Johannes Itten, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Mikhail Larionov, Le Corbusier, Otto Lindig, El Lissitzky, Heinrich Macke, Kazimir Malevich, Ger-hard Marcks, Gabriele Münter, Elie Nadelman, Pablo Picasso, Nico Pirosmani, Charles Sheeler, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Johan Thorn Prikker, Frank Lloyd Wright, and examples of folk art

Works on loan from (selection)
American Folk Art Museum, New York; Centre National des arts plastiques, Paris; Dansmuseet Stockholm; Gerhard-Marcks-Haus, Bremen; Grassi Museum für Völkerkunde zu Leipzig; Hetjens Keramik Museum, Dusseldorf; Ikonen Museum, Recklinghausen; Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany (Connecticut); Kirchner-Museum, Davos; Lenbachhaus, Munich; Musée d’art et d’histoire du Judaïsme, Paris; Musée national Picasso-Paris; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Museum für Gestaltung, Zurich; Museum Ludwig, Köln; New York Historical Society; Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum, Cologne; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Stiftung Hans Arp und Sophie Taeuber-Arp e.V., Remagen; The Jewish Museum, New York; Tretyakov Galerie, Moscow; Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven

Ausstellungsansicht, Blick in den ersten Ausstellungsraum, im Zentrum historische Ausstellungsplakate des Kaiser Wilhelm Museums, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Blick in den ersten Ausstellungsraum, im Zentrum historische Ausstellungsplakate des Kaiser Wilhelm Museums, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, von Michail Larionow entworfene Kostüme für das Ballett Chout (Der Narr, 1921 in Paris uraufgeführt) im Dialog mit Kostümskizzen von Natalja Gontscharowa, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, von Michail Larionow entworfene Kostüme für das Ballett Chout (Der Narr, 1921 in Paris uraufgeführt) im Dialog mit Kostümskizzen von Natalja Gontscharowa, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, für Larionow, Gontscharowa und Malewitsch waren Ikonenmalerei, russische Volkskunst und Lubki wichtige Inspirationsquellen, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, für Larionow, Gontscharowa und Malewitsch waren Ikonenmalerei, russische Volkskunst und Lubki wichtige Inspirationsquellen, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, eine Schamanentrommel im Dialog mit Skizzen und Malereien von Wassily Kandinsky, die nach seiner ethnografischen Expedition nach Russland entstanden sind, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, eine Schamanentrommel im Dialog mit Skizzen und Malereien von Wassily Kandinsky, die nach seiner ethnografischen Expedition nach Russland entstanden sind, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Marionetten aus dem Theaterstück König Hirsch, 1918, die nach einem Entwurf von Sophie Taeuber-Arp angefertigt wurden, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Marionetten aus dem Theaterstück König Hirsch, 1918, die nach einem Entwurf von Sophie Taeuber-Arp angefertigt wurden, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Hinterglasmalereien und Gemälde im Dialog mit Textilien, Alltagsgegenständen und religiösen Ikonen, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Hinterglasmalereien und Gemälde im Dialog mit Textilien, Alltagsgegenständen und religiösen Ikonen, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Werke von Elie Nadelmann im Dialog mit Stücken aus seiner Volkskunstsammlung, Foto: Dirk Rose
Ausstellungsansicht, Werke von Elie Nadelmann im Dialog mit Stücken aus seiner Volkskunstsammlung, Foto: Dirk Rose